Project 10 the Hard Way – It’s ALIVE!

The Dart SHP iron block arrived in a finished condition -- cleaned, finish honed, ready to assemble. 4.125" bore and clearance for 3.875' stroke. This SHP block will be an excellent foundation for our 415-inch engine.

It’s ALIVE!

It’s alive thanks to our many partners and friends. We couldn’t have done it without you.

Without a doubt the Project 10-The Hard Way Firebird bracket car has been a bit of a struggle to get completed. I am in the final stages of getting it to the track. I was hoping for this weekend but I decided not to take it out until it was painted and "finished".

Mechanically there are a few things to do (actually, there will always be a few things to do, right?) but the main project for this year is sitting between the fenders after a few "pulls" on the dyno at AEM (Automotive Engine & Machine) in Waterloo, Iowa.

I will do my best to go over what we built, why we built what we did and the results. I am confident we have a 600-800 run small-block Chevy that I can bracket race until I hang up my helmet.

Getting the right combination of parts is important

The small EDM hole in the Comp Cams solid lifter will provide extra lubrication to the cam and lifters to prevent premature wear.

By that I do not mean getting the heads that flow the most air, the biggest camshaft and biggest carburetor. I mean a combination of parts that will put you where you want to be, financially and horsepower-wise to accomplish what you are shooting for in your own racing program. My plan was to get about 500-550 HP so the engine would be efficient and pull hard, but I did not want parts that took a lot of maintenance week to week.

I just about wore the guys out at Competition Products with my questions on the different engine packages they offered. We started talking about using an OEM Chevy block that they prep and getting a 355" rotating assembly. The conversation led us to the fact we would need more compression and camshaft than I wanted to run to get to the 500 HP numbers. Their tech guys thought the best route would be to go with more stroke in the engine, lower the compression, and it would take less camshaft (which means it is easier on valve train parts).